Halitosis
Friday, May 8, 2009

Bad breath, medically called halitosis, can result from poor oral hygiene habits and may be a sign of other health problems. In today’s 60 Second Housecall, Dr. Edward Hill talks about the causes of bad breath and what can be done about it.

Bad breath can be caused by the types of foods you eat and unhealthy lifestyle habits.

Foods are digested and absorbed into your bloodstream.  They are eventually carried to the lungs and given off in your breath. If you eat foods with strong odors, brushing and flossing—even using mouthwash—merely covers up the odor temporarily.

If you don’t brush and floss your teeth daily, food particles can remain in your mouth, around the gums and on the tongue. This causes bad breath.

Smoking or chewing tobacco-based products can also cause bad breath.

Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in your mouth may also be warning signs of gum disease.

Some steps you can take to reduce or prevent bad breath include:

· Practice good oral hygiene

· See your dentist regularly 

· Stop smoking or chewing tobacco-based products, and

· Drink lots of water.

Antiseptic mouth-rinses can kill the germs that cause bad breath. Ask your dentist which product is best for you.

For North Mississippi Medical Center, I’m Dr. Edward Hill.