Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

It is normal for the liver to contain some fat. However, if more than five to 10 percent of the livers weight is fat, then it is called a fatty liver. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the build-up of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol. Dr. Edward Hill explains more about this condition in todays 60 Second Housecall.

Dr. Hill:

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a buildup of fat in the liver that is not caused by drinking alcohol.

There is no definite cause, but it may be related to obesity and a lack of exercise.

Most people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease do not know they have it. There are usually no symptoms. Your doctor can do tests to check your liver. Blood tests check the liver for injury, and can rule out other conditions that cause liver disease.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is treated with a healthy diet, exercise and weight loss. Over-the-counter omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E and some prescription medicines also may be helpful.

Exercising regularly and keeping a healthy weight are important. Your doctor may recommend getting shots for hepatitis A and B. You should also limit how much alcohol you drink to prevent alcohol-related liver disease.

Most people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease will not get chronic liver disease. Rarely, it can lead to more serious liver problems.

For North Mississippi Medical Center, Im Dr. Edward Hill.